Diabetes and Oral Health

Diabetes and Oral Health

Oral health is essential to general health and well-being, especially for those who have diabetes. High blood sugar can weaken white blood cell, making it harder to keep mouth healthy. If untreated or uncontrolled, diabetes can affect dental health in five different ways.
 
Here is how diabetes can take its toll on your oral health and some suggestions for diabetes patients.

Dry Mouth
Studies have shown that people with diabetes have less saliva, leading to a condition known as dry mouth. How can you fight it? By drinking plenty of water. You can also try sugar-free gum. Ensure the gum doesn't contain sugar because any extra sugar combined with dry mouth can lead to cavities. Another essential part of dental care for people with diabetes is remembering to brush twice a day to keep cavities away.
 
Thrush
People with diabetes are more likely to develop thrush. Also known as oral candidiasis, thrush is a fungal infection of the mouth. Signs of thrush include white or red patches inside your mouth that can be quite painful. What is a good diabetes dental care strategy to avoid getting thrush? Keep your glucose in check and practice good oral hygiene habits.
 
Poor Healing
Do you get cold sores in your mouth that don't seem to heal? This could also be a condition brought on by diabetes. The right blood sugar levels help heal cold sores or cuts, whereas if your blood sugar levels aren't under control, your injuries will not heal quickly or properly. The best dental care for a diabetic patient in this situation would be to consult with a dental professional.
 
Gum Disease
Another dental care concern for people with diabetes is gum disease. For a person with diabetes, it becomes tough for the body to defend itself against a bacterial infection like gum disease. When left unchecked, high glucose levels can create an environment in the mouth where bacteria can thrive and flourish. This can result in tissue damage, which, if untreated, can lead to eventual tooth loss. If you find your gums bleeding or see leaky pus between your gums and teeth, the right diabetes dental care would be to immediately consult a dental professional.
 
To prevent gum disease, brush your teeth twice daily, and floss at least once a day.
 
Change in Taste
If you have diabetes, you might be surprised – and even disappointed – to find that some of your favorite foods don't taste as rich and flavorful as you remember. Having diabetes can cause a change in your taste. While this is undoubtedly disappointing, this could also be an opportunity for you to discover new foods. If you notice a persistent bad taste, the best dental care for a diabetic patient would be to check with a doctor.
 
Living with diabetes is a journey – one that might feel overwhelming as you start to navigate it. You might have been surprised to learn the link between diabetes and your oral health, but we're here to ensure that your teeth and mouth stay healthy. By drinking plenty of water, paying attention to any warning signs, and regularly brushing and flossing, you can keep any possible problems at bay!
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